Opportunity 

Amazon has a rare opportunity to snatch up cheap planes and take on FedEx: Tech

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

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Un trabajador pasa junto a un Boeing 767 con las letras “Prime Air” en el fuselaje, el jueves 4 de agosto de 2016, en un hangar de Boeing en Seattle. (AP Foto/Ted S. Warren)

Amazon has a rare opportunity to snatch up cheap planes and take on FedEx: Now could be the best time for Amazon (AMZN) to dramatically increase the size of its air fleet. That’s according to Bank of America analyst Justin Post, who sees the depressed price of aircraft, coupled with the massive increase in demand for delivery services spurred by the coronavirus pandemic, as a golden opportunity for the e-commerce giant to pump cash into its Amazon Air division. READ MORE

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Amazon has a rare opportunity to snatch up cheap planes and take on FedEx

Now could be the best time for Amazon (AMZN) to dramatically increase the size of its air fleet. That’s according to Bank of America analyst Justin Post, who sees the depressed price of aircraft, coupled with the massive increase in demand for delivery services spurred by the coronavirus pandemic, as a golden opportunity for the ecommerce giant to pump cash into its Amazon Air division.

And while that would help Amazon increase its one-day shipping capabilities, it could also give it the firepower it needs to solidify its nascent third-party delivery business as a true competitor to the likes of FedEx (FDX) and UPS (UPS).

Aircraft prices are slumping

According to Post, the cost to lease a B747-8F is down 13% since the start of 2020, while B777s and Airbus 330s are off by 10%, as airlines have cut back on capacity due to the dramatic decrease in air travel

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Why Warren Buffett thinks about Ted Williams when he misses an opportunity

One of the world’s most legendary and respected investors, Warren Buffett, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (BRK-A, BRK-B), may have some investing regrets. But just like in baseball, even the greatest hitters strike out now and then.

“I’ve made so many mistakes, if I tried to kick myself, my legs would be exhausted,” Buffett told Yahoo Finance’s Andy Serwer in a March 10 interview at Berkshire Hathaway’s headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska. “You don’t kick yourself in the investment. You don’t kick yourself when you make a mistake. I mean, it is part of what you do. And you know, I was there when Ted Williams batted .406.”

Williams, the legendary Red Sox left fielder, achieved that batting average in 1941. And he has since been the last baseball player to bat above .400 since. Keep in mind: that means for every 10 times he was at bat, he didn’t make it

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Impossible Foods CFO on opportunity amid coronavirus pandemic

U.S. meat producers appear to be under siege during the coronavirus pandemic. Several meat packing plants have temporarily closed after large outbreaks among workers, including Tyson Foods (TSN), which suspended operations Wednesday at an Iowa plant that is critical to the nation’s pork supply.  

Those plant closures could create an opportunity for meat-alternative companies, such as Impossible Foods and rival, Beyond Meat (BYND).

“There’s no question our opportunity is defined by the meat-eater,” David Lee, Impossible Foods’ CFO,  told Yahoo Finance’s “The First Trade.” 

Lee says Impossible Foods has not experienced any disruption to its supply chain because of the COVID-19 crisis: “We’ve actually seen through this crisis our restaurants change behavior. Many restaurants can now serve the direct-end customer.”

Lee says restaurants including GroundHouse Killer Burgers in Atlanta and Prairie in San Francisco have pivoted to retail, opening general store websites that allow them to sell the Impossible Burger

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Connecticut Governor says Coronavirus is more tragic because ‘we had an opportunity to see it coming’

The coronavirus outbreak has upended American life, shutting hundreds of millions of people in their homes and drawing comparisons to crises like 9/11 and the Great Depression. But the current turmoil is more devastating than past catastrophic events because some of the coronavirus damage was avoidable, said Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont.

“It’s even more tragic, because we had an opportunity to see it coming, and now it’s going to change things forever, and we don’t know when it’s going to end in its current form,” Lamont said in a newly released interview, taped on Friday, March 20.

Mistakes made at the Centers for Disease Control led the agency to underestimate the threat posed by the coronavirus, ProPublica reported on Thursday, citing internal emails obtained through a public records request. Other reports, including an investigation by the New Yorker, have detailed bureaucratic and communications shortcomings that delayed testing for the

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