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Brands need to bring change that lasts ‘longer than a trending topic,’ expert says: Tech

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

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Protesters raise a fist during a march on June 10, 2020. (Photo by Yann Schreiber / AFP) (Photo by YANN SCHREIBER/AFP via Getty Images)

Brands need to bring change that lasts ‘longer than a trending topic’: expert: According to Social Chain CEO Steve Bartlett, there are ways companies can show their support in the fight against racial inequality without coming off as phony and predatory, including providing concrete examples of how brands are working to make changes themselves. READ MORE

Activision CMO on Black Lives Matter: ‘There is no social justice without economic support’

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Brands need to bring change that lasts ‘longer than a trending topic’

Social media sites ranging from Facebook (FB) and Instagram to Twitter (TWTR), Snapchat (SNAP), and LinkedIn (MSFT) have seen a flurry of posts from multinational corporations and small businesses alike in their support of protests against police brutality in the wake of the death of George Floyd.

But brands also straddle a fine line between expressing support for protesters and simply trying to capitalize upon increased public support for the movement. 

According to Social Chain CEO Steve Bartlett, there are ways companies can show their support in the fight against racial inequality without coming off as phony and predatory, including providing concrete examples of how brands are working to make changes themselves.

“Don’t view this as a moment of [public relations] opportunity. View it as a moment for real change,” Bartlett told Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade.

The CEO’s firm develops social media strategies for major brands including SuperDry, Veet,

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3 big reasons retail brands die in America

The retail graveyard is littered with headstones of one-time favorite places to shop.

Who didn’t enjoy buying AA batteries for a new Sony Walkman in the late 1980s at RadioShack? RadioShack effectively died in 2015 after years of irrelevance. Blockbuster was a great place to rent a $5 movie for a stay-at-home date night. Then came Netflix and chill, and the death of Blockbuster in 2010.

Sears was Amazon before there was Amazon. But today, the U.S. is full of vacant Sears stores after its 2018 bankruptcy at the hands of the modern-day Amazon.

And now a new crop of former heavyweight retailers are about to be wheeled into the graveyard after the COVID-19 pandemic shuttered stores nationwide for months. In doing so, the flawed businesses of once iconic retailers J Crew, Neiman Marcus, J.C. Penney, and Lord & Taylor have been exposed via high-profile bankruptcy filings. 

The retail

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Netflix, Disney join other big brands in support of George Floyd protests on ‘Blackout Tuesday’

Hollywood is voicing its support for the “Black Lives Matter” movement, which manifested itself online Tuesday via a viral social media campaign.

The initiative, referred to as “Blackout Tuesday,” circulated widely among platforms. Originated by leading names in the music industry as a day to “disconnect from work and reconnect with our community,” the movement quickly spread across social media with multiple brands, along with individual accounts, posting a black square in solidarity.

The “Blackout” movement was adopted by prominent entertainment and media companies, as protests over the death of George Floyd continue to rage throughout the nation. Netflix (NFLX) was one of the first entertainment giants to issue a statement on the matter.

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Dunkin Brands meets two key criteria for outperforming during the pandemic

Dunkin’ Brands (DNKN) has what it takes to rebound amid the economic shocks of the coronavirus pandemic — as well as grow beyond it, according to Morningstar analyst R.J. Hottovy.

“Investors should prioritize those firms that have the scale to be more aggressive on pricing near term,” Hottovy wrote in a note to investors.

“Value-oriented players tend to outperform during economic shocks,” he added.

The analyst goes on to highlight a robust mobile ordering and payment platform and healthy balance sheet.

“In our view, Dunkin’ Brands satisfies the value and mobile technology criteria,” he said.

“While we believe some franchisees will experience severe distress, we think the company offers a dynamic global consumer growth story,” he added.

FILE – In this Feb. 6, 2019, photo a box of Dunkin’ Donuts is displayed in New York. Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc. reports financial earns on Thursday, Oct. 31. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

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