July 19, 2019 archive

The Value of Sponsored Blog Posts: How Much to Pay Market Influencers

A new blog post being writtenRapid expansion in the field of social media influencers has resulted in lots of questions from seasoned online marketers. While influencers provide brands with a great way to reach untapped target audiences, knowing how much to pay such individuals for their market power can be tricky. Thankfully, findings from a recent survey on UK bloggers from the software experts Vuelio shines some much-needed light onto the expected market value of influencer sponsorship.

The Survey Headlines

The online survey from the software experts was sent to everyone in a database of around 7500 bloggers. Around 12% of bloggers took part, and there were 787 usable responses. Just over three-quarters of respondents – 78% – informed Vuelio that up to half their blog work is paid. Niches, where bloggers reported getting payments for 50%+ of their blog work, included gardening, fashion, nature, beauty, lifestyle, and parenting.

So, now you’re wondering how much do influencers earn? The survey findings showed that the figure trended towards <£250 for both paid-for collabs and blog posts. While 27% of UK bloggers who took part said they charged up to £100, 29% of the same group said they have and do charge over £100 but less than £251. 8% of respondents who reported charging nothing for blog posts.

When we turn to the big bucks, the survey findings showed that a blend of super-sector and specialist blogs were able to attract the highest payments. The percent of participants charging over £1000/blog post was 2%, while the percentage of participants charging over £1000 for collabs was 4%.

Bloggers who commanded the largest paychecks were most likely to be blogging in the wedding, business, politics, fashion, beauty, media, marketing manager jobs London, and combination (i.e., food & travel, health & beauty) sectors.

Finding Genuine Influencers

It all makes sense so far, but the tricky part is working out which market influencers will offer your brand the most value for your pounds and pennies. You have to consider the fact that influencer marketing is a saturated field, so getting your brand’s message in front of the right eyeballs amongst all the noise is not easy.

Don’t necessarily assume that a blogger with thousands of followers has great influential market power. And, note that followers are getting wise to shameless sponsorship selling tactics by their favourite online personalities. Any partnership your brand forms with an influencer needs to be believable for it to be worth the money.

Remember, it’s easy to buy ‘likes’, ‘comments’ and ‘followers’ on many social media platforms and call yourself a powerful market influencer even though your genuine market reach is obviously limited – many scam artists are deploying such a tactic to exploit brands.

Finding the Fakes

Research is your best defence against getting duped by fake market influencers. So, be sure to request detailed breakdown stats of any prospective influencer’s audience demographics. The demographics most important to your brand will, of course, depend on the nature of your business, and they could be …

Vegetable Glycerin: What is it?

Also known as glycerine or glycerol, vegetable glycerine is a colourless liquid made from palm oil, soybeans or coconut. Vegetable glycerine is a sweet, mild tasting liquid with a syrup-like consistency.

While it is especially prevalent in the cosmetic industry, it still has a few more uses and is known to provide health benefits, ranging from a strengthened gut to skin health and better hydration. In this article, we will be looking at everything you need to know about vegetable glycerine, from its uses and benefits to its side effects.

Vegetable Glycerin: What is it?

Glycerine is an alcohol-derived sugar extracted from petroleum, animal products, or plants.

Vegetable glycerine is a variant of the same made primarily from plant oils. According to history, this variant was accidentally discovered over two centuries ago, when someone “accidentally” heated up a mixture of lead monoxide and olive oil.

However, it only became industrially and economically significant towards the end of the 1800s when it was used in the making of dynamite.

Vegetable glycerine is prepared by heating vegetable fats rich in triglyceride (like coconut, palm, and soy oils) together with strong alkalis like lye or under pressure.

This leads to the glycerine splitting from fatty acids and mixing with water to create a syrup-like, odourless, and sweet-tasting liquid.

Common Uses of Vegetable Glycerine

It is used widely in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetics industries. For example, vegetable glycerine can be added to foods to help water-based and oil ingredients mix, moistening, or sweetening the final product.

It is also used in the food industry to prevent the forming of ice crystals in frozen foods like ice cream, yogurt, and a variety of other desserts. Glycerol is also commonly used in the making of pharmaceutical drugs such as anaesthetics, suppositories, heart medication, and cough remedies.

At the same time, it is also used in the making of toothpaste since it helps keep the toothpaste from hardening or drying out in the tub. It is also worth noting that it is a commonly used ingredient in the making of candles, deodorant, makeup, soaps, and lotions.

Potential Benefits

Glycerol is hyped as a product with tons of health benefits.

However, the benefits supported by science aren’t that many. Furthermore, there are only a few related studies, and most of them tend to be very small. For us to fully understand the health benefits vegetable glycerine has to offer, more studies are necessary.

The following are the benefits that have been researched the most:

It is a Possible Skin Moisturiser

Vegetable glycerine is quite popular as a skincare treatment since it has moisturising qualities.

Research has shown that applying glycerol on your skin could improve its suppleness and smoothness over time. Using skin products that contain glycerine could improve skin hydration in less than ten days.

Thought to Promote Skin Health

Glycerine could lead to improved skin health by protecting against infections, soothing irritations, and promoting wound healing. According to study results, products that contain …